The Dangers of Xanax Addiction

bottles of xanax in a pharmacy

In a previous post, we had discussed the dangers of alcohol withdrawal and how it can be potentially lethal if a person tries to detox without the help of a team of medical professionals. In this post we will discuss a very similar topic, except we will be talking about Xanax.

 

a person holding several benzodiazepines

What Makes Detoxing From Xanax So Dangerous?

Xanax (also known as Alprazolam) is a drug that is part of the benzodiazepine family which works by slowing down your nervous system by increasing your GABA inhibitors. Just like alcohol, benzodiazepines can be addictive and have similar side effects when a person is trying to distance themselves from the medication.

Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawal

  • Blurred Vision
  • Heart Palpitations
  • Numb Extremities
  • Anxiety
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Sweating
  • Seizures
  • Paranoia
  • Tremors
  • Diarrhea
  • Insomnia

 

What Can Happen If You Don’t Get Help

If you decide to go cold turkey without the aid of a doctor or other medical professionals, then you have some serious thinking to do. Benzodiazepines can cause you to have seizures, and abnormal heart rhythms, which could end up causing you to lose your life. Deciding to quit Xanax is a very healthy choice, but we recommend you do it with the help of a medical professional to avoid any unwanted consequences.

 

The Hard Cold Truth About Xanax

Did you know that almost 30,000 prescriptions are written for Xanax in the United States every year? That is not many prescriptions when you think about the entire population of the U.S., but did you also know that there are over 175,000 emergency room visits related to Xanax and other benzodiazepine overdoses. Frequent Xanax abusers will mix their Xanax medication with other drugs that often create deadly drug cocktails. If you need help, don’t be afraid to reach out before it’s too late.

 

 

Medically Reviewed: September 25, 2019

Dr Ashley

Medical Reviewer

Chief Editor

About

All of the information on this page has been reviewed and verified by a certified addiction professional.

Dr Ashley Murray obtained her MBBCh Cum Laude in 2016. She currently practices in the public domain in South Africa. She has an interest in medical writing and has a keen interest in evidence-based medicine.


All of the information on this page has been reviewed and verified by a certified addiction professional.